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REGIMENTAL ROLL - WORKSHOPS SECTION  
           
 Service Number Surname Initials Rank Unit
           
VX 28901 Aitken BE   W/S
SX 70 Alcock EC Pte W/S
VX 46571 Allan WJ   W/S
VX 36710 Allen C Pte W/S
NX 37610 Allen C   W/S
VX 39102 Anderson TW   W/S
NX 30789 Bartlett GH Sgt W/S
NX 26094 Bauert WJ Cap W/S
WX 33148 Bayliss GC Pte Workshops
VX 37182 Berry AR   W/S
NX 25617 Bishop AS   W/S
VX 37286 Board TW Pte W/S
VX 37286 Board TW Pte W/S
VX 39052 Bowen VT   W/S
WX 31765 Boyce AE Pte Workshops
WX 31765 Boyd AE   W/S
VX 42073 Brew OC   W/S
VX 37903 Brown RE   W/S
VX 37874 Brown RN   W/S
NX 29070 Byles JT   W/S
VX 39100 Byles L   W/S
NX 21829 Cavanagh LJE   W/S
NX 14923 Clark EA   W/S
VX 121213 Clift BE   W/S
VX 33986 Coyle G WOII W/S
NX 23095 Crabtree JW S/Sgt W/S
VX 45372 Crowley JJ   W/S
VX 35854 Crowley WJ Bdr W/S
VX 39101 Duthie SK   W/S
SX 9390 Easther H   W/S
VX 101657 Eddy RJ   W/S
VX 27960 Enright RH   W/S
NX 27473 Faulkner JJE A/Cpl W/S
NX 22280 Fogg R Pte W/S
VX 21874 Frith AP   W/S
NX 22065 Gilmour DR S/Sgt W/S
VX 24477 Goddard LE   W/S
NX 85567 Gough TGW   W/S
NX 55585 Granter AD S/Sgt W/S
VX 23204 Gration AWJ   W/S
VX 32805 Gray JV   W/S
VX 32085 Gray JV   W/S
QX 3149 Grevell WB Cpl W/S
VX 43271 Harrison FC   W/S
SX 746 Heard AK Cpl W/S
SX 10042 Henstridge AR   W/S
VX 39107 Hickman J   W/S
NGX 63 Houghton JR   W/S
NX 37600 Kamm AC   W/S
NX 60638 Kelly VG   W/S
NX 55608 Kent VR Sgt W/S
VX 21921 Kerr GW   W/S
VX 36921 Lee EC   W/S
NX 16069 Lennox A Pte W/S
WX 1484 Lowe AE L/Cpl W/S
NX 71744 Madigan CK Pte W/S
VX 38797 Massina CR   W/S
NX 145530 McGill TJ   W/S
VX 4940 McGiviray K L/Cpl W/S
NX 31237 McGlynn VH   W/S
WX 17252 Murphy TM   W/S
VX 16130 Neale V   W/S
WX 32466 Newman WHE WOI Workshops
NX 8944 Parker KA   W/S
VX 17745 Parkinson WT Pte W/S
VX 40389 Pearce EL   W/S
VX 20279 Picone AA   W/S
VX 36903 Preston AE   W/S
VX 29071 Preston T   W/S
WX 26901 Read GB Pte Workshops
VX 2789 Reichelt FW Pte W/S
VX 34575 Reid NR   W/S (9)
NX 67448 Robinson A   W/S
VX 45646 Shinn VA   W/S
WX 31764 Simpson RC Lieut Workshops
WX 31307 Smith GD Pte Workshops
VX 36720 Smith VJ   W/S
NX 50518 Stockdale C WOII W/S
VX 32176 Stoneham JF   W/S
NX 16824 Sullivan FW   W/S
VX 17621 Thomas JC   W/S
VX 33746 Thorne H   W/S
VX 44491 Tudehope NA   W/S
VX 39104 Turner FWG   W/S
NX 6698 Upham J   W/S
NX 67735 Vippond HE Pte W/S
VX 8805 Watson FC Pte W/S
NX 66480 Weiss C Pte W/S
NX 20019 Wells SE   W/S
VX 28771 Wilberforce EW   W/S
VX 3045 Wiley GR   W/S
NX 30133 Yeo FG   W/S
Extracted From The Regimental Roll       

Service Number

Surname

Initials

Rank

Unit

 

 

 

 

 

 

WX

37271

Adams

A

 

Signals

NX

22921

Bradbury

NM

L/Cpl

Signals

NX

19332

Brown

RE

 

Signals

NX

25068

Burrow

JR

 

Signals

NX

28038

Campbell

JN

L/Cpl

Signals

VX

15547

Cassidy

SE

L/Bdr

Signals

NX

27896

Christensen

CB

L/Cpl

Signals

VX

19449

Coad

JWF

 

Signals

NX

30781

Creamer

RFE

 

Signals

NX

30780

Dann

HE

L/Cpl

Signals

NX

28479

Davis

IU

 

Signals

VX

50887

Farrant

R

 

Signals

NX

25170

Finney

AM

 

Signals

VX

16599

Flaherty

JP

 

Signals

NX

31274

Gleeson

JP

 

Signals

NX

58765

Gleeson

TP

 

Signals

NX

34066

Grass

VG

 

Signals

QX

21617

Hall

WH

 

Signals

NX

19007

Harris

JE

 

Signals

NX

29801

Hennessy

TE

 

Signals

WX

40159

Howie

MJ

 

Signals

NX

23434

Jeffreys

JH

 

Signals

QX

20971

Lane

RG

 

Signals

NX

20372

Matthews

JAF

 

Signals

NX

30633

McDonald

RW

Sgt

Signals

NX

24627

McIntyre

AL

 

Signals

VX

35837

McLeod

HR

 

Signals

NX

24715

Mercer

HA

 

Signals

WX

37272

Millen

PN

 

Signals

VX

21121

Moran

JW

 

Signals

NX

25067

O'Grady

WJ

 

Signals

NX

20015

Oldfield

KR

L/Sgt

Signals

VX

19493

Olney

AD

Sgt

Signals

VX

31990

Peters

RG

 

Signals

NX

22592

Phillips

WGG

 

Signals

NX

22950

Piddock

HA

 

Signals

NX

25075

Richards

LW

 

Signals

NX

19539

Rowe

LT

 

Signals

NX

20197

Sandow

CFH

L/Cpl

Signals

VX

33302

Scott

KC

Cpl

Signals

VX

19962

Sewell

LA

 

Signals

NX

20503

Shying

MM

 

Signals

NX

24384

Sims

FL

 

Signals

VX

19528

Smith

NC

Cpl

Signals

NX

23007

Susans

RW

 

Signals

NX

19015

Thornton

AF

 

Signals

VX

30386

Toohey

DW

 

Signals

NX

12248

Traynor

NJ

 

Signals

NX

28261

Tuckfield

SC

 

Signals

NX

29893

Veness

CM

 

Signals

NX

38642

Waddell

WR

 

Signals

VX

19450

Wale

F

 

Signals

NX

29892

Wallis

FA

Sgt

Signals

NX

20370

Welsh

TD

 

Signals

NX

28595

Williams

LR

Lieut

Signals

NX

28262

Williams

RF

 

Signals

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extracted from the Regimental Roll

 

 

 

 

The 2nd/3rd Australian Light Anti-Aircraft Regiment was initially raised in Melbourne on 1 July 1940, trained at Werribee Race Course and embarked for the Middle East in December 1940. The Regiment was ultimately represented by a total of 1,935 servicemen who served with distinction in World War II, with Battle Honours from Tobruk, Crete, the Western Desert, Syria, Port Moresby, Milne Bay, Lae, Buna and Borneo. The Regiment experienced a high number of casualties through deaths, wounded and prisoners of war.

When formed, the Regiment consisted of:

  • Regimental H.Q. commanded by Lt. Col. John W Rhoden with Capt. AF Young as Adjutant, Capt. Alan Michaelis as Quartermaster and Capt. PG Hayes as RMO.
  • 7th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery commanded by Major JA Hipworth
  • 8th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery commanded by Major PW Stokes
  • 9th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery commanded by Major CL Hughes-Hallett
  • 2/3 Light Anti-Aircraft Signal Section commanded by Capt. NW Traynor, raised in New South Wales
  • 2/3 Light Anti-Aircraft Workshop Section commanded by Capt. H Metzner

In 1945, and following the cessation of hostilities, the Regiment Association was formed to co-ordinate an Annual Reunion of original members, to conduct an Annual General Meeting, to assist former members in need of assistance, and since 1988, to produce the Association’s Annual Newsletter “Take Post”, which comprises stories and photos relating to the personnel, feats and history of the 2nd / 3rd.

A detailed history of the Regiment entitled “On Target”, and detailing the raising of the Regiment, its training and its various operations in the Middle East and the Pacific, was produced by Ron Bryant (8th), Les Harris (7th) and Cec Rae (9th) in 1987.

Modern technology has enabled the Association to digitise 'On Target', which is now available for viewing and down loading from our web site as either a whole book or in individual sections.

In recognition of the advancing age and dwindling numbers (less than 100) of the original members of the Association, the Constitution of the Association was amended in 2008 to allow the descendants of original members to become full members of the Association.

The Association has determined to entrust the descendants, also referred to as the 'Remembrance Group', with the future carriage of the Association.

The current Executive of the Association is actively seeking to broaden the awareness of the history and operational activities of the 2nd / 3rd Anti-Aircraft Regiment in particular and the role of Anti-Aircraft units in general through the development of this website and its associated links.

The number of known surviving original members of the Regiment Association is now only four. In addition, a number of widows of former Regiment members continue to be members of the Association, and there are also almost 100 members of the 'Remembrance Group'.

Last updated 26 April 2019

Regimental Roll - RHQ

 

Service Number

Surname

Initials

Rank

Unit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VX

27047

Alexander

MW

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

25419

Ampt

MA

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

32807

Anderton

EJ

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

26134

Bell

RJ

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

25400

Boulton

GC

Sgt

RHQ

 

NX

13812

Buck

BEL

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

23697

Carpenter

JP

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

13902

Cavanagh

RJ

Bdr

RHQ

 

VX

48159

Cole

HC

Bdr

RHQ

 

VX

43698

Collins

AG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

37676

Corkill

EE

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

18997

Daley

SM

Pay

RHQ

 

VX

50099

Danger

GS

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

27395

Davey

KF

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

14121

Dyer

K

Capt

RHQ

 

VX

46867

Elder

KW

WOI

RHQ

 

WX

31430

Fisher

GG

Capt

RHQ

 

WX

4841

Fitzhardinge

DMB

Capt

RHQ

 

NX

10658

Grant

VV

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

23303

Gray

J

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

34759

Hambling

SF

Bdr

RHQ

 

VX

28577

Hancock

AE

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

42125

Hansen

WH

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

24909

Hartley

RG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

28575

Hauser

P

WOII

RHQ

 

VX

48422

Hayes

PG

Capt

RHQ

 

VX

131455

Hill

GLB

?

RHQ

 

VX

32510

Hole

LG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

33828

Hulse

C

Sgt

RHQ

 

VX

45129

Humm

JG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

14296

Lester

DJ

L/Bdr

RHQ

 

VX

46591

Malthouse

PC

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

33956

McLean

EG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

47597

Michaelis

A

Capt

RHQ

 

VX

38411

Mills

LB

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

48131

Minahan

PF

Gnr

RHQ

 

NX

66125

Neale

V

A/Sgt

RHQ

 

VX

29466

Peace

HR

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

37270

Penglase

RN

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

21168

Polwarth

EW

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

12690

Quinlan

JN

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

17654

Reed

FW

Lieut

RHQ

 

VX

24127

Reed

WH

L/Bdr

RHQ

 

VX

13726

Rhoden

JW

Lt Col

RHQ

 

VX

42008

Rickerby

HG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

47285

Riddell

WG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

37944

Riley

AG

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

26073

Ritchie

HL

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

35024

Robertson

KC

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

15357

Rosenberg

CS

Lieut

RHQ

 

VX

28764

Rowan

KS

T/Capt

RHQ

 

VX

43046

Skipper

HEJ

Sgt

RHQ

 

VX

16524

Sloan

W

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

17623

Smith

WL

L/Bdr

RHQ

 

VX

38605

Speeding

CR

L/Sgt

RHQ

 

VX

28549

Spiller

AE

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

48587

Spooner

F

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

35516

Thomas

JC

WOI

RHQ

 

VX

26792

Townsend

JME

Gnr

RHQ

 

VX

36727

Turnham

WH

Bdr

RHQ

 

NX

26047

Welch

JG

Gnr

RHQ

 

NX

123748

Wightman

DB

Capt

RHQ

 

VX

32095

Winter

A

Gnr

RHQ

 

NX

10915

Wood

RG

Gnr

RHQ

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extracted from the Regimental Roll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. DONELLY   V.X.46836    2/3 L.A.A.   EX. P.O.W.

 

I enlisted on the 29/7/1940 and was drafted into the 2/3 Light Anti-Aircraft Artillery. I was stationed firstly at Caulfield and from there sent to Werribee. At both places we were stationed at the racecourse where we slept on straw palliasses in the concrete stands. Our training was done at Werribee and in December 1940 we sailed for Palestine on the ‘Mauretania’. Other ships in the convoy were Queen Mary, Aquitania, Dominion Monarch and Awatea. After some time in the desert we were then shipped to the island of Crete in the Mediterranean.

 

The German intention was to invade Crete by sea but the British Fleet sank all the invading boats and barges. The Island was then bombed solidly for two weeks, then Paratroopers were flown in of which hundreds were shot down and killed before the Germans finally made a landing at Maleme.

Here they set up a landing strip and finally overran the Island

The British ships ‘Imperial’, ‘Dido’, ‘Orion’ and ‘Hereward’ sailed in to evacuate the troops who boarded the ships during the night of May 28th.1941. At 5.30 am. on May 29th.,under heavy Stuka attack, the ‘Hereward ‘,the ship I was on , received a direct bomb which went straight down the funnel. Quite a number of our soldiers and British naval men were killed when the ship was hit, others went down with the ship but the majority jumped overboard and were picked up some hours later by Italian torpedo boats.

 

I had been in the water about six hours and have no recollection of being picked up by the torpedo boat. We were taken up to the beach of a small Island and, according to my mates, I was laid out with the dead bodies. Luckily, I eventually became conscious and, with others, was sent to Rhodes Island for three months, the first three weeks of which were spent in hospital because of exposure in the water.

We were issued with one set of underwear, one pair of socks, one pair of boots –mine were size 9-I take size 6-, one pair of trousers, one shirt, one jacket and two blankets. These were all the possessions we had as all our belongings went down with the ‘Hereward’.

 

We were then shipped to Italy and sent to a camp at Capura and from there to Bolzano in the north of Italy near the Brenner Pass. After some time we were moved to camp 57 at Gruppignano near Udine close to the Yugoslavian border. This infamous camp was under the command of Colonel Calcaterra. Details of this camp can be read in Malcolm Webster’s book, ‘An Italian Experience’ and Alex Barnett’s book, ‘ Hitler’s Digger Slaves’.

We spent about twelve months at this camp and were then sent to work in the rice fields on the Lombardy Plains for the next twelve months. Here our beds were three tiered bunks with thin straw mattresses. Our daily rations were as follows;

Macaroni or rice 66 gms

Bread                200 gms

Cheese                50 gms 

Beans                  30 gms

Coffee - made from acorns - 7 gms

Vegetables           30 gms

 

Meat and bone- which we were allotted every second week – 150 gms.

Macaroni, beans and vegetables- possibly stale cabbage leaves- were made into soup in the camp kitchen and when cooked it was very thin and we were each issued one   

ladle at 11am. each day. In the afternoon we were issued with a bread roll. These rations were 7% above starvation point and this was our daily menu for twelve months.

 

Three hundred and eighty cases of beri beri went out of the camp in one day to the local hospitals.

The camp was crawling with lice and rats and we were allowed one shower a week.

In the winter we were often without water because of the intense cold and would have to melt snow to obtain water.

Hut searches were often carried out for hidden radios, maps and compasses so we were stood outside in the bitter cold of winter or the heat of summer from 8am.till night fall. Sniffer dogs were used and often turned on the men. At one stage I was imprisoned for a month in solitary confinement as some of us protested over the lack of food. I was handcuffed for ten hours a day for this period. My daily food consisted of two slices of dry bread and a drink of water. Bed was the floor with no blankets. It was impossible to walk after a month so I had to crawl back to the huts.

Red Cross parcels eventually came through but with much irregularity. These were supposed to be issued each week but if there was any trouble amongst the men they were withheld and sometimes the Italians stole some of the parcels so this meant the remaining parcels had to be shared. It was reported that an Italian Major was imprisoned for ten years for stealing parcels.

 

The contents of Red Cross parcels were:

Evaporated milk                  400 gms

Lunch biscuits                     250 gms

Cheese                                 250 gms.

Cocoa                                  250 gms

Sardines                               500 gms.

Pork meat                            375 gms

Corned beef                         375 gms

Sweet chocolate                  340 gms

Sugar                                   125 gms

Powdered Orange Cons.      200 gms

Prunes                                 500 gms

Instant coffee                       125 gms

Cigarettes           2                 20’s pkt.

Smoking tobacco   1            60 gr pkt.

 

This camp, 57,at Gruppignano, was known to be the worst camp in Italy.

There were many escape plans and it took 5 or 6 months to dig one tunnel (dug by 

 

Western Australian miners) from which about 40 men escaped but most were recaptured next day. Punishment for trying to escape was severe beatings andimprisonment. The method used to disperse of the soil from the tunnels was to cut sleeves out of old shirts and attach them to the inside of the leg of the trousers and fill with the soil. It would then trickle away whilst walking around the compound.

Fences of barbed wire, about 15feet high, with an inner entanglement of wire, surrounded the camps. At each corner was a sentry box with a searchlight and a guard armed with a machine gun.

 

When Italy capitulated I was loose for sixteen days before being captured by German S.S. (Secret Service) troops. During this time I lived on what food I could find, mainly maize in the field and a few grapes if I was lucky. Some days I didn’t have any food at all. Once captured, I spent the night in the Turin gaol before being sent to Germany in cattle trucks. These trucks were so crowded it was impossible to lie down so we all had to take lying down in turns. This trip took three days and three nights. We were put into camp 344 then sent to a working camp, Lager 741,which was situated in Zwittaw near the Czechoslovakian and Old Sudatenland border. At this camp we were deloused, showered and issued with a new set of clothes. There were no lice in this camp in Germany. Here we were issued with extra food:

 

Bread                                 500 gms

Meat (old horse)                100 gms (not every day)

Coffee                                150 gms (once a month)

Margarine                            25 gms (believed to be an extract of coal)

Sugar                                   25 gms

Jam                                      25 gms (occasionally)

Cheese                                 10 gms

Oats                                     10 gms

Potatoes                            500 gms (in soup)

 

Occasionally we had sauerkraut with caraway seeds. At one stage we were snowed in so no food came into the camp. We lived on swedes and mouldy black bread.

 

The coldest temperature during this period was 28* below and the warmest was 21* below. We wore all our clothes to bed and had two blankets but nothing would warm us, it was so cold. At this camp we worked for twelve months on building construction work and had to go to a quarry for stone for the foundations. This was during the severe winter so had to remove the snow and ice before we reached the stone, which was quarried with picks.  

 

We were treated well by our guards who were older men and had been in W.W.1 and been POWs themselves. They were A1 compared to the stand over tactics of the Italian guards. I spent 2 ½ years in Italy and 1½ years in Germany. When the war ended we tried to reach the Americans at Pilsen about 500 miles away. We walked for days and everywhere we looked there were people going home. The roads were packed and 3 million came into Prague. The Germans bombed Prague for four days so there were dead lying everywhere. We met the Russians on 9/5/1945 at a town called Jablene (pronounced Gablene) on the Czechoslavakian border, then wewere caught up in a fight with three SS armies who would not surrender to the Russians. The SS were trying to get to the Americans in Pilsen. We eventually got to Prague where we spent five days. Whilst there, we saw the Russian victory march in that city. Upon arrival in Pilsen the Americans took us to Regensburg. On May 14thwe left by plane for Reims and then on to England. We arrived home in Australia in July 1945 on the ‘Stirling Castle’ after being away 1669 days.

The two most important things to come out of these events were the appreciation of our freedom, our country and the companionship and comradeship of the men.

 

One chap in our camp worked from the age of twelve on a station property at Tharlawindi in New South Wales. When war broke out he rode his horse 600 miles to Sydney to join up. He could neither read nor write. He celebrated his sixteenth birthday in the prison camp.

 

  The Hereward          by  W.Dellar         C.Troop 7th. Battery 2/3rdL.A.A.

 

It was early in the morning of the 29thof May

When she received the warning of Stukas on the way

‘Hereward, that grand old ship, a destroyer of the fleet

Was sorely overloaded with evacuees from Crete

 

Guarding her two mother ships, unable to manoeuvre

A fighter to the last, as records well will prove her,

Her four point sevens flinging death into the skies    

Mingled with the chatter of her multiple point fives.

 

A near miss shook her plates and like noisy thunder,

One landed down below split boilers and pipes asunder.

With motive power silenced and guns destroyed on deck,

She lay upon the ocean a helpless floating wreck.

 

To leave the burning ship, was the order of the day,

Without panic or confusion but a little less delay.

Throwing floats and wreckage overboard and discarding all our gear,

We quickly followed after into Father Neptune’s care.

 

A south east swell was rolling, the water icy most,

As we bravely struggled onwards towards the distant coast.

Above, the Stukas glided to the object of their quest,

Till battled scarred and burning she slid to her last rest.

 

For five long hours we labored at the mercy of the seas

Till rescued, wet and weary, by the Ities M.T.B’s.

Some killed on board by shrapnel, some perished in the sea,

And we picked up at long last, live in captivity.

 

But when the war is over, and we are back at home,

We’ll think of them in future years who lie beneath the foam.

Those comrades of our hardships, and pals of high degree,

We’ll remember at reunions and drink to their eternity.

 

Written 5/10/41 at Prato Isarco (POW camp).